First Issue: 

Addressing the issue of Female Genital Mutilation in African, Middle Eastern and Asian territories.

Female genital mutilation is the ritual cutting or removal of some or all of the external female genitalia for nonmedical reasons. The practice is found in Africa, Asia and the Middle East, and within communities from countries in which FGM is common. An estimated 200 million girls and women alive today are believed to have been subjected to FGM and rates of FGM are increasing, which is a reflection of global population growth. The practice is mostly carried out by traditional circumcisers, who often play other central roles in communities, such as attending childbirths. However WHO strongly urges health professionals not to perform such procedures. The central aim of this council is to address the issue of Female Genital Mutilation in African, Middle Eastern and Asian territories. 

 

Second Issue:

Controlling the spread of Tuberculosis through political and social awareness to further increase optimized care, surveillance and research.

Tuberculosis, the world’s top infectious disease killer, claims 5,000 lives each day. The heaviest burden is carried by communities which already face socio-economic challenges: migrants, refugees, prisoners, ethnic minorities, miners and others working and living in risk-prone settings, and marginalized women, children and older people.“TB strikes some of the world’s poorest people hardest,” said Dr Margaret Chan, WHO Director-General. “WHO is determined to overcome the stigma, discrimination, and other barriers that prevent so many of these people from obtaining the services they so badly need.” The main goal of this council is to control the spread of Tuberculosis through political and social awareness to further increase optimized care, surveillance and research.

 

For any inquiries regarding this council, please feel free to contact the chairs at who@bayanmun.com